Census: Immigrants have changed the Snoqualmie Valley’s complexion

March 3, 2011

It is no surprise that Snoqualmie has changed dramatically in the past 10 years. Snoqualmie Ridge has expanded at a rapid pace, with forests being replaced by wending streets lined with homes.

But the once sleepy city isn’t the only part of the Valley that has seen dramatic change in the past decade.

All of the Snoqualmie Valley has changed. Its complexion has darkened. While still predominantly white, the Valley has a growing minority population.

Read more

Snoqualmie squeaks ahead of North Bend in U.S. Census response rates

April 8, 2010

NEW — 6:00 a.m. April 8, 2010

Snoqualmie is ahead of North Bend in census responses, according to the latest numbers available April 5.

Read more

The census count should matter to you

March 17, 2010

NEW — 1 p.m. March 17, 2010 

Check your mailbox this week for your household’s census survey. Oh, that’s right, you already know about that, thanks to last week’s letter notifying you that another letter is coming. That first letter cost $57 million to send, in hopes that fewer in-person census takers will be needed.

Read more

Valley population still booming

July 24, 2009

 

By Ryan Piersol
The city of Snoqualmie is still the fastest-growing city in the state since the start of the decade — and it’s not even close.
Numbers recently released by the Office of Financial Management show Snoqualmie’s April 2009 population at 9,730. That’s 370 people higher than the census number a year ago.
Since 2000, Snoqualmie has grown from 1,631, adding more than 8,000 to its population. That’s an increase of 496 percent, easily the highest in Washington. The city of Roy is second on that list at 234 percent, while DuPont is third at 212 percent.
The swell, of course, is expected to continue in Snoqualmie, thanks to developments on the Ridge. Bob Cole, economic development specialist for the city, said the original plan entailed the construction of more than 4,000 homes on the Ridge, and that a little more than 3,000 of those have been built.
“So, (the population) will keep going up. The big question is when that is going to happen,” Cole said. “Prior to 2007, things were moving along at a pretty rapid pace. Now, in 2009, new construction in all of our cities has really slowed down.”
Cole said that he and city officials see no shortage of reasons why people want to move to Snoqualmie.
“I think that Quadrant and the city of Snoqualmie have done an excellent job in design with the homes on the Ridge. They’ve created a place where people want to come and live,” he said. “People love the concept and the proof is how rapidly they’ve bought the product. It’s probably the biggest reason why we’ve been so successful.
“In addition to that, access to I-90 and Bellevue and downtown Seattle has been very helpful. And, of course, is there any place more beautiful to live than the Snoqualmie Valley?”
North Bend’s population stayed steady — as it has done the entire decade — increasing from 4,710 to 4,760. City officials, however, do not expect it to stay that way for long, thanks to a recent annexation and a series of scheduled developments.
Last month, the city annexed the Tanner addition, which will add another 900-1,000 to the city’s population. Earlier this year, North Bend also officially ended a decade-long building moratorium by striking a new water deal. The end of the moratorium is expected to spur a significant amount of new developments.
“It’s going to take at least 2009 to build and construct,” Community and Economic Development Director Gina Estep said. “But, in the next two years, we’re looking at another 1,500 people.”
Development projects officially scheduled include 68 cottage homes planned off Trasher Avenue, another 56 single-family homes off Ribary Way and 120 single-family homes in a project north of town.
Reach editor Ryan Piersol at editor@snovallesytar.com or 392-6434. To comment on this story, go to www.snovalleystar.com.

 

The city of Snoqualmie is still the fastest-growing city in the state since the start of the decade — and it’s not even close.

Numbers recently released by the Office of Financial Management show Snoqualmie’s April 2009 population at 9,730. That’s 370 people higher than the census number a year ago.

Since 2000, Snoqualmie has grown from 1,631, adding more than 8,000 to its population. That’s an increase of 496 percent, easily the highest in Washington. The city of Roy is second on that list at 234 percent, while DuPont is third at 212 percent.

Read more